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You can’t argue with classic style, lol. 
Golden Girl gym attire. Kinda want. :)

You can’t argue with classic style, lol.

Golden Girl gym attire. Kinda want. :)

 

I thought this TED Talk was insightful, refreshing and incredibly candid. Cameron is eloquent, provides shockingly ‘real’ talk about the illusion of beauty, modelling, and self-esteem. She also shares some of her own images, both real life and covers, to show how much goes in to the photographs we see everyday.

Excerpt from TED blog.

“I always just say I was scouted, but that means nothing,” Russell says in her talk. “The real way I became a model is that I won a genetic lottery, and I am a recipient of a legacy. For the past few centuries, we have defined beauty not just as health and youth and symmetry that we’re biologically programmed to admire, but also as tall, slender figures with femininity and white skin. This is a legacy that was built for me, and that I’ve been cashing in on.”

In this talk, Russell delivers two powerful messages: First, that young girls who dream of being a model should think of it like they would winning Powerball—something to shoot for, but “not a career path.” Second, Russell takes on the tendency to think that life would be better and easier if we were more beautiful. Russell’s response: “If you ever think, ‘If I had thinner thighs and shinier hair, wouldn’t I be happier,” you just need to meet a group of models. They have the thinnest thighs and the shiniest hair and the coolest clothes and they are the most physically insecure women, probably, on the planet.”

But Russell has another point she wants to convey too. While many bemoan the use of Photoshop for making models look thinner and imperfection-free, Russell says that this is just the tip of the iceberg. To hear more about how the image of sex appeal is carefully constructed from the ground up, watch her bold talk. And after the jump, pay attention as Russell shares the reality behind some of her sexy images.

Cameron-Russell-1

This is the very first photo that Cameron Russell ever took as a model, shot for the magazine Allure in 2003, when she had just turned 16. Yes, she may look like the beacon of femininity. But she hadn’t so much as gotten her period yet. To hammer the point home of just how young she was at the time, she’s contrasted the image with a bathing-suit shot of her with her grandma, taken just a months before.

Cameron-Russell-2

Russell looks like a siren in this red bikini. Despite looking well into her 20s in the image, she was just a teenager when the photo was taken. For argument’s sake, here’s a photo of her on the beach with a friend taken the same day. Her look: polka-dotted innocence.

Cameron-Russell-3

Another illustration of how young Russell was as she embarked on her early modeling career—in this shot, she looks beautifully brooding in a shot for French Vogue. However, she was giggly at a slumber party just days before.

Read More.

Alexa Chung Doesn’t Want To Be Your Thinspo
LOVED reading this post. 
Though many seem to be less sympathetic to the plight of the “thin”, it’s fundamentally important to me that we stop judging women for what they look like. All women. Including her. And her. And her.
There are some SERIOUS issues when it comes to body diversity in fashion, television, films, magazines and other media. Simply put, the majority of the bodies we see represent only a TINY fraction of what the population looks like. Or even possibly COULD look like. The average fashion model represents a body type that only about 3% of women in the world can attain healthily (and that’s assuming that she, herself, is in fact healthy. Eating disorders in the fashion community are nothing new). The thing is, that we can’t determine health by looking at someone. And calling people disgusting, whether they are thin OR larger, is WRONG. Bullying. Mean. I don’t care what your purpose is; making someone feel badly for the body they are in is NOT the way to go.
So I defend all bodies.. .but not all behaviors. Meaning, I can be anti-eating disorders without commenting that someone looks ill or emaciated. I can promote body diversity and speak about photoshopping practices without putting people down. I don’t have to compare women to get my point across: comparing hurts us all.
Good for Alexa to speak up about it. It’s tricky to talk body image in the fashion industry, but she handles it fairly well. 
Excerpt via Jezebel

The British former model and television presenter had to temporarily shut down her Instagram in April after her followers started commenting obsessively about her body in ways almost anyone would find distressing — people regularly called her body “disgusting,” “ugly,” “gross,” and worse, and others said that simply posting pictures of herself going about her daily business was tantamount to promoting thinspo.
“I think it’s about time people stopped judging women on their appearance and more on their intellect. Like you can appreciate my style without having to appreciate my weight. It’s not actually mutually exclusive. I just get frustrated because just because I exist in this shape doesn’t mean that I’m like advocating it.”
“I just think that whole culture of hatred, and also feeling like it’s your right to judge people when you don’t know them is really fucked up. So I’m pleased I experienced that side of it, so I can learn to be a better person on the other side of it. I’m sure in the past I’ve been judgmental too…Self esteem, that’s something you got to work on yourself. I know for me it’s different day to day.”
Read more.

Alexa Chung Doesn’t Want To Be Your Thinspo

LOVED reading this post.

Though many seem to be less sympathetic to the plight of the “thin”, it’s fundamentally important to me that we stop judging women for what they look like. All women. Including her. And her. And her.

There are some SERIOUS issues when it comes to body diversity in fashion, television, films, magazines and other media. Simply put, the majority of the bodies we see represent only a TINY fraction of what the population looks like. Or even possibly COULD look like. The average fashion model represents a body type that only about 3% of women in the world can attain healthily (and that’s assuming that she, herself, is in fact healthy. Eating disorders in the fashion community are nothing new). The thing is, that we can’t determine health by looking at someone. And calling people disgusting, whether they are thin OR larger, is WRONG. Bullying. Mean. I don’t care what your purpose is; making someone feel badly for the body they are in is NOT the way to go.

So I defend all bodies.. .but not all behaviors. Meaning, I can be anti-eating disorders without commenting that someone looks ill or emaciated. I can promote body diversity and speak about photoshopping practices without putting people down. I don’t have to compare women to get my point across: comparing hurts us all.

Good for Alexa to speak up about it. It’s tricky to talk body image in the fashion industry, but she handles it fairly well.

Excerpt via Jezebel

The British former model and television presenter had to temporarily shut down her Instagram in April after her followers started commenting obsessively about her body in ways almost anyone would find distressing — people regularly called her body “disgusting,” “ugly,” “gross,” and worse, and others said that simply posting pictures of herself going about her daily business was tantamount to promoting thinspo.

I think it’s about time people stopped judging women on their appearance and more on their intellect. Like you can appreciate my style without having to appreciate my weight. It’s not actually mutually exclusive. I just get frustrated because just because I exist in this shape doesn’t mean that I’m like advocating it.

I just think that whole culture of hatred, and also feeling like it’s your right to judge people when you don’t know them is really fucked up. So I’m pleased I experienced that side of it, so I can learn to be a better person on the other side of it. I’m sure in the past I’ve been judgmental too…Self esteem, that’s something you got to work on yourself. I know for me it’s different day to day.”

Read more.

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Best Sports Bra for Large Chest

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I’ve long held the belief that when it comes to promoting positive body image, the WORST thing we can do is start picking apart each others bodies. Time and time again, I see women (well-intentioned, intelligent, pro-lady women) tear down models for their ultra thin frames & it makes me sad and angry.

While we have a substantial body image crisis in terms of representation & diversity, the models we see are women who’ve been hired BY an industry that’s looking to sell us a product (note: that formula only works when we buy into it). They are hired specifically for their looks & they have a genetic “advantage” (if you choose to see it that way). But when I think of the abnormal pressure to be ‘thin’ in today’s world, I count them among the victims. I’d have to argue that no other group of women is so heavily targeted, pressured or bullied to be thin, ideal and flawless. Depression, eating disorders and body image issues are issues that plague the modeling industry, and their world isn’t as glamorous as we’d like to believe.

Sexual harassment, industry bullying and abuse also run rampant within the industry. A new organization, Models Alliance, is hoping to change that, and also hopes to encourage healthier practices amongst models, better work conditions and assistance (psychological) for models in distress. Remember that many of these women get into the industry very, VERY young.

Health is what I’m all about. These measures will not change much in terms of the standards of beauty required to make it to the runway: they’ll still be beautiful, tall & thin. But healthy is something I’d like to add to that list. It’s far too common to hear of models dying before the age 30 due to health problems from years of eating disorders, fueled by insecurity, pressure and bullying from a young, YOUNG age.

Baby steps in the right direction.

Excerpt via Blisstree

It’s probably safe to assume that when most people think of modeling, they equate it to an easy job where beautiful girls get to walk around in beautiful clothes all day. But if you ask them, they would likely tell you that it’s anything but the glamorous picture some people paint. In fact, it can include downright deplorable conditions that include sexual harassment, abuse and bullying. Thank goodness models are finally realizing this and fighting back with a new Models Alliance that will hopefully provide the industry with healthier role models.

Model Sara Ziff founded the nonprofit organization because she was tired of the treatment she and other models were receiving. The alliance is seeking to establish workplace standards, that will, among other things, include privacy to stop unauthorized nude photos and clear the backstage area of photographers and non-essential staff when the models are changing clothes. They also seek to reduce child labor infringements and provide advice on how to handle body image bullying and sexual harassment, which she says are all too common in this industry.

Read more.

I’m pretty sure the controversy was unintended: Donna’s been doing work in Haiti since the earthquake and has been a big supporter of helping the country get back on its feet.

But… how many people looked at and approved this ad without thinking it might stir some pots? Granted, the images are ‘pretty’ but the ad campaign certainly rubbed me the wrong way: fancy model Adriana Lima posed seductively in front of 2 Haitian men who are left in the background, almost in a cave = wtf. Are people so far removed that they didn’t see WHY expensively clothed models in one of the poorest nations in the world might be a little… well, slap-in-the-facey?

Many are calling the ads imperialistic, and while I don’t think that was the intention, I agree. Left with a yuck feeling.

According to Karan, the line was inspired by the work of Haitian artist Philippe Dodard, who’s known for his sculptures and abstract paintings of human figures. CocoPerez suggested the line would have been more appropriate using Haitian models. While they still would have been wearing those expensive clothes, it might have garnered more good will. 

And, sidenote, where are the profits going?

What do you think?

Model Adriana Lima’s Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show diet lands her on 360’s RidicuList.

As you know, I do my best to make sure I never comment on other women’s bodies. I don’t believe in unhealthy body types. Rather I believe that unhealthy behaviors need to be addressed and discussed. I want to make it clear that my comments & opinions about the story above have nothing to do with what she looks like: there’s a lot of model hate out there, and while I firmly believe the fashion industry needs a good dose of reality (and a kick in the ass), I don’t blame the ‘players’. I blame the game. 

However, THIS certainly falls under unhealthy behavior. So discuss it we shall. 

Whenever I see stories like this, despite my inner bitchy, I always tend to sympathize with the models. I can’t even begin to understand the world they live in. If you think the pressure to look a certain way weighs heavily on the general public, models get it ten fold (believe me, I’m not walking around saying “Oh, poor pretty models. Life is so hard for them. Yada yada”. Rather, I think it’s too commonly accepted to see them as the aggressors in the unrealistic body war, as opposed to victims). They don’t set the standards: they’re hired because they meet them and they are expected to KEEP meeting them, long after they move into different stages of womanhood.

Not only do they need to walk the runway in front of thousands of strangers (getting pictures taken from every angle imaginable), but not fitting a certain ‘look’ could lose them potential work & sabotage an already short career. When a model doesn’t meet these incredibly high standards, she faces more scrutiny than the average person. It helps to understand this when approaching the world ‘models’ live in. It’s not the same as normal people’s. In real life, no one weighs you before you get hired and you don’t have hundreds of people nitpicking at every flaw on your body. You also don’t have competition around every single corner (even if you feel like you do, you don’t).

I’d lose my freaking mind. No thank you.

(Side note: it’s not just runway models. Fitness models also aim to look a certain ‘way’, and some get there using unhealthy methods as well. Plus sized models also have guidelines to follow. In any industry where your looks or physical attributes are on display, there is a pressure to fit a “mold” one way or another).

It’s true that some runway models are naturally thin, most have genetics on their side and most watch what they eat to maintain their “look”. But when they feel the need to go the extra mile and engage in an unhealthy lifestyle or regimen in order to keep their job? That’s a little scary. And when it’s so normal to them that they can talk about it openly and wind up on the Ridiculilst? That’s even scarier.

It’s important to remind people that this is NOT normal, healthy or okay behavior.

Over dieting & over restricting can cause brain damage, infertility, liver damage, decreased kidney function, hormonal issues, slowed metabolism, heart problems, hair loss and death. A diet like hers is dangerous, irresponsible and unhealthy, even for short spurts of time.

In other words: don’t have what she’s having & don’t do what she’s doing. K?

Any thoughts?

Werk it girl!

Unbelievable. Go Kirstie! 

On a separate note: Let’s not tear each other down ladies (the comments on the page made me embarrassed for woman kind to say the least). Support each other! We’ve all been there for her ups and downs, and you know what? She deserves a freaking high five and not the scorn of other women.

P.S - All the negativity reminds me of this quote ‘How You Feel About Me Is Between YOU and YOUR Self-Esteem’.

Love her! Congrats Kirstie!

Interesting article…

I prefer personal responsibility for the majority of these blame games (studies show that even when magazines use un-airbrushed models like we ask for, we don’t buy them. It’s a two way street friends). However, in the fashion industry specifically, there seems to be an inherent danger to the girls who work the runways, are brought into the culture and are consumed by the latest fashion trends.

I mean, imagine being weighed before work every day? We all recognize the pressure we feel, but I can’t imagine the pressure they’re under.

The words skinny & runway are almost synonymous…

Interesting article, let me know what you think.

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